Seizure

Bernhard Altmann came from an orthodox Jewish family in Galicia. His maternal grandparents had a knitwear factory in Przemyśl, where he was born, managed by his mother Keile (later Karoline) Tischler before she married.

The numismatist Fritz Dworschak took advantage of the Nazi era to assume central functions in the Vienna museum scene.

Rosa Glückselig, née Heitler, was married to the grocer Moritz Glückselig (1890–1974) and had two sons. She ran the delicatessen Zur Raxbahn at Neulerchenfelderstraße 27 in Ottakring, where the family also lived.

David Goldmann came from extremely modest circumstances to settle in Vienna in the early 1910s, from where he worked his way up to become director of Ujpester Tuchfabriks AG in Budapest, Wollwarenverkaufs AG in Günzelsdorf and Stoffdruckfabrik in Guntramsdorf.

The transporter Paul David Herzfeld lived with his wife Stefanie at Ausstellungsstraße 45/I/14 in Vienna's 2nd district. He fled in August 1938 via Czechoslovakia to Palestine. He lived in the 1950s in Tel Aviv, where he also died.

The coin collector Leo Heymann, born in the town of Schwersenz, which with its large Jewish community was until 1918 part of the German district of Posen-Ost and in 1919 became part of Poland under the provisions o

Until 1938, Stefan Jellinek was an extraordinary professor at the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Vienna.

The Joanneum was founded in 1811 by Archduke Johann together with the Styrian estates as the "Innerösterreichisches Nationalmuseum" ("Inner Austrian National Museum").

In June 1941 the seized and later expropriated Monastery of the Augustinian Canons with its art collection was put in the charge of the

Anton Lanckoroński graduated from the Schottengymnasium in Vienna and then served from 1912 to 1917 as an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army. After the war and the re-establishment of the Polish state in 1918, he took Polish citizenship.

The year 1368 and the completion of the Johannes von Troppau Evangeliary marked the starting point of the Habsburg book collections. The magnificent manuscript is regarded as the founding stone of the Austrian National Library.

Valentin Viktor Rosenfeld studied law at the University of Vienna and obtained his doctorate in 1910. As a lawyer he represented footballers in contract disputes with their clubs.

Until the annexation of Austria to the German Reich, Steinbach bei Göstling hunting lodge and some other properties in the region were owned by Louis Rothschild.

Oskar Weitzmann was the son of the photographer Jakob Weitzmann and Rosa, née Löwenthal. His five siblings, Berthold, Bronia, Josef, Osias and Willi Weitzmann, also worked in photography in Vienna.